TRSA's Hygienically Clean Healthcare Certification Earns AORN Seal of Recognition

November 2, 2015

TRSA, the leading global textile services trade association, today announces its Hygienically Clean Healthcare Certification program standards have received the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) Seal of Recognition™ for its certification materials.

The AORN Seal of Recognition confirms the certification program has undergone a thorough quality review by AORN and is consistent with the organization’s Guidelines for Perioperative Practice. 

According to AORN, this is not a product endorsement but rather a demonstration that the educational and informative material provided about the certification program is sound and reliable. Specifically, the Seal of Recognition recognizes the certification program’s materials on the “Standard for Producing Hygienically Clean Reusable Textiles in the Healthcare Industry.”

“Since the creation of the Hygienically Clean certification in 2012, TRSA has continued its work to raise the bar and standards within the commercial laundry industry through this program,” explained Joseph Ricci, president and CEO of TRSA. “We’re honored to have successfully earned AORN’s Seal of Recognition for our Hygienically Clean program and we’ll continue to work with our membership to ensure the industry is held to the highest possible standards of cleanliness and safety.”

To be considered for Hygienically Clean Certification, facilities handling healthcare linens are inspected for adherence to best practices and quality assurance requirements.

This inspection is preceded by two rounds of bacteriological testing of laundered textiles by an independent, TRSA-approved laboratory. Samples must pass a total of three rounds of testing to qualify for certification.

To maintain certification, facilities must regularly repeat the tests: the Replicate Organism Detection and Counting (RODAC) protocol, quarterly, rather than the previous protocol of twice per year; and United States Pharmacopeia (USP) 62, for microorganisms most commonly found in healthcare environments, twice yearly. This frequent quantification of performance fosters continuous improvement through adoption of new laundering techniques to deliver a better level of cleanliness.

“Hygienically Clean standards have a very large and positive impact on public health in general because they lower the overall community infectious disease risk burden,” said David F. Goldsmith, MSPH, Ph.D, an occupational and environmental epidemiologist with George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health in Washington, D.C., who recently conducted a third-party review of the certification program. “TRSA Certification offers a serious marketing advantage versus competiton laundries who have not adopted the Hygienically Clean process.”

According to TRSA, by Dec. 31, 2015, it expects approximately 50 percent of commercial laundries exclusively handling linens and other textiles from healthcare facilities will have earned its Hygienically Clean certification. Complete information on the program and its newly revised protocols and best practices can be found on the program’s new website at hygienicallyclean.org

See the latest posts on our homepage


Share

Topic Area: Press Release


Recent Posts
Recent Posts

Chicago hospitals set up homeless patients with permanent housing


Investment improves health and reduces costly emergency room visits

1/19/2018

Reproduction clinic expansion keeps patient satisfaction in focus


Colorado system developed guidelines for all facilities

1/19/2018

Builder says virtual and augmented reality transforming construction industry


Healthcare Design series asks leading healthcare design professionals, firms and owners what gets their attention

1/19/2018

The benefits of managing healthcare operating expense with a CMMS


This critical healthcare system gives HTM professionals the ability to proactively manage work requests, inventory items, and assets, which in turn can improve patient care and reduce operating costs

1/19/2018

Understanding lighting codes and standards


Guidance from ASHRAE, Title 24 and LEED will affect project planning, as well as longer-term savings and performance

1/19/2018





Post Comment




FREE
NEWSLETTER

• News and Updates
• Webcast Alerts
• Building Technologies



All fields are required.