System uses bacteria to purify water

April 11, 2017

A University of British Columbia-developed system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water was tested this week prior to being installed in remote communities, according to an article on the Infection Control Today website.

The system consists of tanks of fiber membranes that catch and hold contaminants while letting water filter through. 

A community of beneficial bacteria, or biofilm, functions as the second line of defense.

Membrane water treatment is not new, but the modifications developed produce an even more effective solution.

Read the article.

 

 

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Topic Area: Infection Control


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