Erie hospitals undergo major renovation, expansion

February 27, 2019

Over the next 11 months, Saint Vincent Hospital in Erie, Pa., plans to open its renovated women’s and infants unit, Health + Wellness Pavilion East Side, a new emergency department, expanded operating rooms and the Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute at Saint Vincent, according to an article on the Go Eerie website.

At the same time, Erie's University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hamot is building a $111 million, seven-story patient tower where the UPMC Hamot Professional Building used to stand — the largest construction project in the hospital’s history.

Each hospital is undergoing the expansions in an effort to draw more patients to their respective health systems, according to the article.

Hamot and Saint Vincent aren’t the only hospitals undergoing renovations. Erie Veterans Affairs Medical Center is in the midst of projects that date back to 2008 and will continue through the end of the year under a five-year, $35 million plan.

Read the article.

 

 

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