Scrutiny Mounts on HVAC-COVID-19 Connection

By By Dan Hounsell
March 3, 2021

While early efforts to control the COVID-19 pandemic focused on sanitizing surfaces, the focus quickly turned to the role played by airflow through facilities. As a result, scrutiny continues to mount for HVAC system performance and the equipment’s role in preventing the spread of the coronavirus.

Recently, the former head of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) indicated his belief that many employers are not taking adequate measures to address the real risks for COVID-19 in the workplace, according to JD Supra. Dr. David Michaels said that in addition to droplet and surface transmission, the virus may become airborne for extended periods of time.

The CDC updated its guidance in October 2020 to address this potential, but the agency maintains that the virus primarily spreads through close contact.) He goes on to recommend that in addition to masks, social distancing, and other preventative measures, OSHA should require employers to carefully review their ventilation and airflow systems.

Some state COVID-19 standards already in place require employers to review and upgrade HVAC systems where feasible. A more aggressive approach, such as that suggested by Dr. Michaels, could include other measures such as advanced filtration, installation of blowers, or even new ductwork in parts of a workplace that suffer from poor ventilation.

Click here to read the article.

See the latest posts on our homepage


Share

Topic Area: HVAC


Recent Posts
Recent Posts

Taking on Tornado Season: Is Your Healthcare Facility Prepared?


Scientists predict 2021 could rival 2011 super outbreak

4/21/2021

Is UV Germicidal Light Effective in Operating Rooms?


New study shows whether environmental services teams can use UV to disinfect between surgeries

4/21/2021

Food Service Supply Chain Issues Prompt Changes


Management team decided to create secondary menus to ensure they had backup plan

4/21/2021

Diagnostic Software Delivers Energy Efficiency


Trouble spots included leaky water valves and faulty valve actuators and damper actuators

4/21/2021

Case Study: Hospital Design Centers on Patient Healing


Creating uplifting atmosphere was central to inpatient pavilion at Vassar Brothers Medical Center

4/21/2021





Post Comment




FREE
NEWSLETTER

News & Updates • Webcast Alerts • Building Technologies

All fields are required.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.