Stanford University Medical Center breaks ground for new hospital

By Healthcare Facilities Today
May 2, 2013
Photo courtesy of Rafael Vinoly Architects.

The official groundbreaking for the new Stanford Hospital took place May 1 in Palo Alto, Calif. Once constructed, the facility will add 824,000 square feet to the existing hospital, increase patient capacity to 600 beds, and expand intensive care and emergency services. Completion is expected in 2017, and patient care will begin in 2018.

Designed by Rafael Vinoly Architects, the building concept is based on a philosophy of patient-centered care. The facility will feature individual patient rooms with large windows that provide natural light. The rooms will also have ample space for family members to visit and spend the night. Additionally, the hospital will have a garden level that provides a quiet retreat for patients and families. 

The new hospital construction is part of the $5 billion Stanford University Medical Center Renewal Project intended to bring facilities to current seismic safety standards and support the growth of the overall medical center. 

For more information on the renewal project, visit SUMCRenewal.org.

 

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